There was Way too Much to editorialize concerning Iraq this week, so it gets its own special edition in the Weekly Rambling Intelligence feature . . .

Announcements:
One: Iraqi Slogger has gone membership only, USD 60 per month as of today.  It’s a great site, aggregating all the Iraq news, and this is your last week to link to it from Ramblin’ Gal (so you can enroll).  Two: for those of you very interested in Iraq affairs, this week Joshua Foust at the Conjecturer gave the blow-by-blow daily readout, which he does extremely well.  This post will get you started

Congress gets a Clue, or Three:
This is so funny/not: finally the Congressional members on FFMs in Iraq realized they were living in a fantasy when they discovered the cheat sheet each person in the Green Zone had on them about their Iraq votes.  It’s very sad when our best personnel in the most dangerous place have to act like they work for Dear Leader.  And it seems to suggest that partisanship, and not military knowledge, continues to run this effort right into the ground.

Worse, this information was available in Harper’s years ago, en embryo, with the wallet sized card the soldiers carry around to remind them how to treat the press.  It’s fatuity that has kept this realization from Congress for so long.  Maybe it will also come to mind that their gratuitous FFMs could be diverting staff from real work–but nah. 

For a different delegation, reality did rear its head: or its surface-to-air missile: evasive maneuvers as the last delegation left.  They were actually being shot at, which is such a bummer for the spinner’s orchestration.  Maybe they can call it the parting strains of the 1812 2007 Overture.  Or maybe that will make these lawmakers feel more falsely akin to the troops who put up with this as a matter of course. 

An independent commission set up by Congress notes the corruption and sectarianist bents of the Iraqi Police.

The U.S. General Accounting Office reports that only three of the eighteen benchmarks are being met, not eight out of eighteen (again an almost useless way to measure the benchmarks), which has electrified Congress yet again– But here’s a surprise: Bush fights back.

Matt Taibbi on the cost-plus contract at Rolling Stone: cronyism created the police academy rendered unusable by poor plumbing, a stock-exchange started by a 24 year old Republican American neophyte–and more.  It reeks.  And if you don’t trust Rolling Stone, you can read GAO Report No. 07-711, DOD cannot ensure that US-Funded Equipment Has Reached Iraqi Security Forces, (pdf, 25 pages), or the one-page Highlights.

The U.S. is not processing enough applications for Iraq refugees who have assisted the U.S. and are most at risk if things get worse: this goes double for those who have worked with contractors and are not acknowledged as being at risk.

Iraq in Iraq:
The Kurdish Region now has a fatal cholera outbreak

I see little political rapprochement-this Iraq analyst sees that political decisions are not so much the problem as that politics has not translated to economic policies, and that neither politics nor economics has been taken to the people.  One case in point: the relatively more-stable Kurdish areas are having difficulty providing utilities to its citizens, because the central Government has not built any power infrastructure in the region.  Therefore, the KRG has made its own arrangements with Qatar.  Yet another reason why the center cannot hold.

The good news is that General Petraeus solicits independent thinking and analysis from his junior officers.  One report he received was leaked to the Washington Post, which says that Iraq’s central government is a participant in Civil War.  All are denying it, because it will serve no purpose in the field, but many are acknowledging its truth in private.

Violence in Karbala, when Shia religious observation was rendered deadly between Sunni/Shia and then became inter-Shia factional fighting between Sadrists and SIIC elements.  On Tuesday, Mr. al-Sadr declares a ceasefire for six months, which, after SIIC headquarters in Najaf, Kufa, Baghdad and Iskandaria are bombed, has actually lasted more than six hours.  However, the Sadrists insist they will not take it well if their members are detained, questioned, or otherwise interfered with.  Huh.

Following al-Sadr’s lead, the Iraqi government calls for a universal cease-fire: not the other way around . . .  not too much good news this week. 

About two weeks until the September Benchmark Report. . . I’ll probably do this again next week.  There’s plenty more news where all this came from; this post could be twice as long . . .

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